Change of heart soapbox front

$15.00

Change of Heart - Soapbox

Format: LP
Label: Cargo Records CAR 08
Year: 1989
Origin: Toronto, Ontario
Genre: rock
Keyword: 
Value of Original Title: $15.00
Make Inquiry/purchase: email ryder@robertwilliston.com
Release Type: Albums
Websites:  No
Playlist: 1980's, Ontario, Canadian Rock

Tracks

Side 1

Track Name
Massacre
Dugout Days
Roar
Right up My Back
Without Reason
Everytime
Diesel Brain

Side 2

Track Name
Pat's Decline
Winter's Over
Maybe
Picture Perfect
Vicious Numbers
My Desire
Stand Corrected

Photos

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Change of Heart - Soapbox

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Change of Heart - Soapbox

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Change of Heart - Soapbox

Change of heart soapbox front

Soapbox

Videos

No Video

Information/Write-up

Change of Heart was a Canadian alternative rock band, active from 1982 to 1997.[1] They had one Top 40 hit, "There You Go" in 1992, as well as several hits on Canada's modern rock charts, including "Trigger" and "Little Kingdoms".

The band had a diverse, genre-defying sound, with the songs on their albums crossing from pop to hard rock to something almost akin to punk.

The band was formed in 1982 in Toronto, Ontario by vocalist and guitarist Ian Blurton and bassist Rob Taylor initially inspired by contemporary punk rock bands such as The Clash, Gang of Four and L'Étranger.

Over the next number of years, Blurton also participated in a number of side projects, working with Jolly Tambourine Man, Cowboy Junkies, Slightly Damaged and A Neon Rome. Original percussionist Mike Armstrong left the band during the recording of their 1987 album Slowdance, and would later join King Cobb Steelie.

The band's 1989 album Soapbox featured the song "Pat's Decline", the band's first single to garner widespread national exposure on MuchMusic and Brave New Waves.

Drummer Ron Duffy left the band in 1991, and was replaced by Glenn Milchem for the recording of their 1992 album Smile. Following the recording, Milchem left to join Blue Rodeo, and was replaced by John Richardson. Bernard Maiezza, formerly of A Neon Rome, also joined the band during this era.

Smile was produced by Michael-Philip Wojewoda, at the same time as he was juggling two other significant projects, Barenaked Ladies' Gordon and Rheostatics' Whale Music. The album spawned the band's only Top 40 charting single, "There You Go", which took off after a radio program director in Saskatchewan placed the song in rotation on his station.[1] Fellow musicians also frequently praised the album; Milchem wore a Change of Heart T-shirt in Blue Rodeo's music video for "Rain Down on Me", Steven Page wore one in Barenaked Ladies' video for "Brian Wilson", and Andrew Scott wore one in Sloan's original video for "Underwhelmed".

Following a cross-Canada tour with Crash Vegas, Taylor chose to leave the band. He was replaced by John Borra, Maiezza's former bandmate in A Neon Rome who had also previously toured as a solo artist opening for Change of Heart. The band then embarked on tours as an opening act for The Tragically Hip and Blue Rodeo.[1] They also won $100,000 from that year's CFNY-FM "Discovery to Disc" competition, over Treble Charger and Killjoys.

Following the tour to support their 1994 album Tummysuckle, Borra left the band and was replaced by Rob Higgins for the band's final album, 1997's Steelteeth. Videos for the singles "Little Kingdoms" and "Grifter's Plow" received substantial airplay on MuchMusic's alternative showcase program The Wedge.

The band toured in 1997 to support Steelteeth, including the Another Roadside Attraction festival tour, but broke up soon afterward.

Blurton, the band's singer and main songwriter, went on to form the bands Blurtonia and C'mon, as well as becoming a record producer. Maiezza went on to form Cookie Duster with Brendan Canning of hHead; that band released its debut album, produced by Blurton, in 2001.

Ron Duffy: drums, vocals
Rob Taylor: bass
Ian Blurton: vocals, guitar
Prince Dino El Fabrizio: keyboards
Mike Armstrong: percussion
Michael Phillip Wojewoda: vocals

Produced by Michael Phillip Wojewoda and Change Of Heart
Engineered by Michael Phillip Wojewoda and Ormond Jobin

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